Posts Tagged ‘cabbage’

CSA Share for 2013 Week Seven

I really loved the variety in our share this week, and we even got some delicious fruit!  In our share this week:

  • arugula
  • kale/swiss chard
  • mizuna
  • lettuce
  • green beans
  • cucumbers
  • zucchini/summer squash
  • cabbage
  • peaches
  • apples

How right Farmer Anne is when she says in our newsletter that some members are excited to see the arugula back this week.  I admit I was not a fan at all when I joined our CSA 15 years ago, but now it’s one of my favorites.  The turning point for me was when she wrote in a 2011 newsletter to cook some arugula and cherry tomatoes in olive oil, add hot penne pasta, cheese (I use feta), and lemon juice (see photo above).  I’ve been in love with arugula ever since.  Thanks, Anne!

I’m extra-psyched about the arugula this year because not long ago, I discovered my favorite pizza while eating out one night:  Prosciutto and Fig Pizza with Arugula.  I’ve found an online recipe here, but there are lots of variations out there, so take a look and give it a try.  (You could also make it simpler by adapting it to my Tortilla Pizza recipe.)

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CSA Share for 2012 Week Seven

Even if I know how to prepare my veggies, sometimes I just need a little inspiration.  Reading cookbooks usually does that for me, and this week I found a beautiful new cookbook at the library:  The Homemade Pantry by Alana Chernila.  I especially like Alana’s writeups before each recipe which make each one special.  I’ll be sure to try her Hummus and her Nut Butter recipes, but I’ll wait till winter to make her Lentil Soup.

In our share this week:

  • garlic
  • basil
  • lettuce
  • swiss chard
  • cabbage
  • Chinese cabbage
  • cucumbers
  • potatoes

Basil and Garlic:  My family looooooves basil pesto, so the big bunch of basil was a welcome sight.  I thought I had my pesto recipe down-pat, and had been using walnuts instead of pine nuts for years (see my Arugula Pesto recipe post, and simply replace the called-for arugula with basil).  But then my husband was talking to a friend recently who recommended trying pecans as a pine nut replacement instead of walnuts; they’re still half the price of pine nuts but give the pesto a smoother taste than walnuts.  If you’d like to try it, here’s an actual Basil Pecan Pesto recipe.

Cucumbers and Cherry Tomatoes:  Now that the cherry tomatoes are really kicking in, try simply cutting them in half and mixing with diced-up cucumbers, then tossing with olive oil, balsamic, feta cheese, and a little fresh-ground pepper.  This is even better if left to sit for a bit.

Chinese Cabbage:  This is perfect for one of my favorite recipes:  Ellie Krieger’s Chop Suey.   As I mentioned in my previous post from a few weeks ago, I like to replace the called-for wonton skins with chow mein noodles.

CSA Share for 2012 Week Five

I was thinking yesterday that it sure seems easy for me to wander up our farm’s path and load up my veggie bags, but I do try and remember that our farmers combine their experience, expertise, good judgement, and a lot of hard work to produce our absolutely outstanding produce.  THANK YOU, guys!!  In our share this week:

  • lettuce
  • swiss chard
  • mizuna
  • red cabbage
  • summer squash/zucchini
  • cucumbers
  • golden beets
  • broccoli

Since there were extras of summer squash, it’s time to share with you my favorite way to enjoy zucchini:  Zucchini Brownies.  I posted over a year ago on these, in which I link to an old farm newsletter from 2007.   Also in the post is a link linking to another post which links to an old newsletter containing a member’s recipe for Chocolate Zucchini Muffins (it takes some clicking around, but it’ll be worth it!).  🙂

If you don’t feel you can get to your cabbage right away, try freezing it using these tips and see what you think.  Speaking of freezing things, I posted last year on freezing cucumbers and when I took them out months later, they were DELICIOUS.  And, if you have tons of garlic scapes still in your veggie drawer like I do, just mince them up, throw ’em in a bag, and freeze.

(Image courtesy of www.FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

CSA Share for 2012 Week Three

I took this picture of our farm’s cherry tomato plants in case anyone missed getting a good look at them.  There are RED ones in there, and it’s not even July yet.  How about that?!  Even though they’re not ready for us to pick, it won’t be long now.

In our share this week:

  • swiss chard
  • collards
  • lettuce
  • beets
  • cabbage

I think the focus should be on the cabbage this week, since they are REALLY large.  I’m going to try as many coleslaw recipes as I can, starting with Mom’s Coleslaw, No-Mayo Coleslaw, and Haitian Coleslaw.  Also, I’m going to try our green cabbage instead of the napa cabbage in this chop suey recipe from Ellie Krieger that I’ve made many times (another substitution I usually make is chow mein noodles in place of the wonton skins).  Whatever you do, just make sure to eat all your cabbage, since it’s high in Vitamin C, can help prevent/reduce inflammation, and has a chemical that can block the growth of cancer cells and boost DNA repair in cells.

If you have kids or just want some brain exercise, try this classic Wolf, Goat, and Cabbage game.  Also, while looking for cabbage trivia online, I came across this website of Kindergarten teacher Cherie Stihler who lives in Fairbanks, Alaska.  One of the first books she wrote was The Giant Cabbage – An Alaska Folktale, and her website is filled with cabbage-y fun, such as puzzles, recipes, and trivia.  Check it out!

CSA Share for 2011 Week Eleven

Don’t you love pickup this time of year?  Those bags are heavy, with lots of variety inside.   In our share this week:

  • arugula
  • escarole
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • eggplant
  • leeks
  • carrots
  • tomatoes
  • green peppers

Today with that eggplant, I made baba ghanouj for the first time.  I followed this recipe over at littlebluehen.com, but cut it in half.  This version is a lot like hummus, and quite easy to prepare.  Having another eggplant recipe to choose from is always helpful.

I love cooking with leeks, and if it was cooler out I would make a leek and potato soup.  See my previous post for that recipe, and also a slaw recipe using our broccoli.  With the escarole, I think we’re going to make Farmer Mike’s Escarole, Beans, and Sausage recipe (see this week’s newsletter).  I’ve made variations of this, but this time we want to follow the recipe verbatim.

Also, I urge you to try Farmer Anne’s suggestion for using the arugula, of which I’ve been using a slightly-adapted version:  heat some olive oil, saute cherry tomatoes with a big handful of arugula, then add some feta, cooked penne pasta, and a little lemon juice.  I’ve been whipping up this little treat several times a week since reading about it in our newsletter from a few weeks ago (under the What’s New In Your Share This Week section).

What To Do With That Cabbage

Because the temp went down into the 50’s last night (and will tonight as well), I used it as a sign 😉  that I needed to make some soup for lunch.  So, if you still have cabbage in your fridge, QUICK, make some cabbage soup!

I made a hot and sour cabbage and tofu soup from my Moosewood Restaurant Cooking for Health cookbook, but I also found some fantastic-sounding recipes over at tastespotting; just type “cabbage soup” into the search bar, and you’ll be directed to other sites with delicious recipes and beautiful photos.  I think the Sweet and Sour Cabbage Soup looks good, and I’m really looking forward to making Simple Cabbage and Bean Soup.  I’m just happy that cabbage lasts so long in the fridge, waiting patiently for these somewhat cooler days.

CSA Share for 2011 Week Nine

Those white beets sure look interesting.  And I think Farmer Anne is right; I don’t remember ever getting white beets in our share, so these are a new treat for me.  In our share this week:

  • kale
  • lettuce
  • cabbage
  • white beets
  • broccoli
  • summer squash
  • cucumbers
  • tomatoes
  • garlic

I have so many cucumbers that I even resorted to researching how to freeze them successfully.  I came up with this Method for Freezing Cucumbers recipe and tried it out yesterday.  I’ll let you know how it turns out when I break them out of the freezer in the future.  The recipe calls for 12 (pickling) cucumbers, but I only had the larger cucumbers and so used about three of them.  After a little more internet research, I gathered that pickling cucumbers result in a crispier, more flavorful (due to their thinner skins) pickle than the larger slicing cucumbers, but either will work.

A member commented a few weeks ago that she, too, is on a “pickle mission.”  It was then I realized that I haven’t even tried making bread and butter pickles in all my CSA years.  So, I found this Refrigerator Bread and Butter Pickles recipe, which is very similar to the freezing method except for the addition of the spices.

So, don’t let those cucumbers go to waste…join me and start pickling!